nike

Nike Corporate Site

Semi-work: 7 bits of Web design inspiration

1. The Verge  2. hardgraft  3.  Remedy Quarterly’s remedy page  4. Nike’s delineation of its consumer and business sites  5. Foodspotting  6. FontShop’s Education page  7.  An extra item for digital marketing strategy: Thought Catalog’s smart ad opportunity (Levi’s).

And, in an upcoming post, the redesign of Fast Company’s family of sites.

1.  Oh, Verge. You make my heart swoon.  With your overall clean-ness, the mannish triangle that appears on the topmost righthand corner once you start scrolling down, the way that the drop-down menu contents change as you scroll through the product/sub-heading names, the shape of the Next and Previous arrows.

And, most of all, the execution of the floating and clickable category header lightbox which follows the reader through the article.

I actually enjoy your inner pages, much more than your homepage, though.  Your front door, though still snazzy, seems a bit..crazy or hectic once you starting moving down.

2.  I love this site.  Clean, but warm.  Populated solely by necessary content that’s well-organized. Ugh, hard graft, smart.

hard graft Homepage

hard graft

The rest after the jump.

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As if I needed another nudge to like Nike more

I do not like how I’m beginning to look really biased towards Nike.

Today, it rained pretty hard for at least four consecutive hours.

I had to walk through two-inch deep water for approximately ten minutes.

My socks and feet did not get wet at all.

Considering I was wearing jeans, which usually means that the water seeping into my pants would also somehow drip their way into my socks.

I was wearing these.

I actually bought them on sale, and only because I needed a rough-and-tumble pair of sneakers so I wouldn’t ruin these:

Overall, I was really impressed with my Nike WMNS TENNIS CLASSIC in Black and Club Purple.  I expected to have my socks soaking around a minute into the rushing street water, but my feet survived dry.  Hooray cheap Nike sneakers, Hooray!

dove3

Nike: Chosen

Ah, Nike.  I see you are starting to be more aggressive about pandering to the microtrend of individual sport.

In 2007, Mark Penn published the book Microtrends.

Apparently, he’s the man who coined the term “soccer moms”.

In the book, Penn discusses other emerging trends that were sparked by at least 1% of the American population, which, he proposes, could become significant in the next years.

In the field of sports, Penn noted the growing interest in niche and individualized sports, and the decreased involvement in the mainstream and more established team sports (e.g. football, basketball).

In this stunning video by Instrument, Nike shows its ready to beat, okay maybe match Vans, Converse, DC and Roxy at their games.

Nike “Chosen” by Instrument

Even if the niche sport “microtrend” may seem a bit dated (“discovered” 4 years ago), the Nike “Chosen” campaign still makes me proud of how Nike seems to have a good nose for youth culture.

Even the copy for the campaign tries to talk to a new audience — no longer the same market that their physical potency- and determination-centered communication used to target.

Instead, the campaign’s copy recognizes the present youth’s inclination towards uniqueness, flair and self-promotion.

“Take the stage and own the spot light. We’re looking for crews pushing the boundaries of style and creativity. Because the further you go, the further we all go.”

via fubiz

I have to correct myself now, though.  It apparently isn’t the first time that a Nike campaign featured skateboarding.  In my search for more old school testosterone-y Nike ads from the 1990’s (to feature in this post), I came across a blog entry which was a collection of Nike ad graphic design that the blogger was impressed with.

This particular ad was released in 2007 – the “This Is How I Fight” campaign.

I love you slightly more today because of this, Nike.  I have to find the agency or communications group that came up with this campaign.  I’m sorry, “Chosen”, but “This Is How I Fight” edged you out in my heart.

And, while I’m at it, I might as well post the very first Nike ads (from 1989) that sparked my liking for the Nike brand, and for copywriting and branding.

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