Hooked’s Eyal: 3 Steps to Hooking Users

Nir Eyal wrote “Hooked”, a book on developing strategies to hook users into products.

The first post from him that I came across talked about three (3) steps to make your users form a habit:

STEP 1 – IDENTIFY

Now that you have the requisite site and stats, you need to answer the first question of Habit Testing: “Who are the habitual users?” First, define what it means to be a devoted user. Ask yourself how often a user “should” use the site. That is to say, assuming that some day all the bugs are worked out…how often would you expect a habitual user to be on the site?

Be realistic and honest… you’re just looking for a realistic guess to calibrate how often users will interact with your site.

WHO’S GOT THE HABIT?

Now that you know how often a user “should” be using the site, it’s time to crunch through the numbers and identify how many of your users actually meet that bar. This is where hiring a stats wiz can prove exceedingly helpful. …The best practice here is to get create a cohort analysis to provide a baseline by which to measure future product iterations.

STEP 2 – CODIFY

Hopefully, you’ll have at least a few users who interact frequently enough for you to call them devotees. But how many devotees is enough? My rule of thumb is 5%. Though your rate of active users will need to be much higher to sustain your business, 5% is a good benchmark to being Habit Testing.

However, if at least 5% of your users don’t find your product valuable enough to use as much as you predicted they should, you have a problem.

…Even if you have a standard user flow, how users engage with your site creates a unique data fingerprint which can be analyzed to find patterns. Sift through the data to determine if there are similar behaviors that emerge. What you’ll hopefully discover is a “Habit Path”, a series of similar behaviors shared by your most loyal users.

STEP 3 – MODIFY

With new hypotheses in mind, it’s time to get back inside the build, measure, learn loop and take new users down the same Habit Path the devotees took. For example, leveraging their Habit Path, Twitter’s onboarding process now guides new users to start following others immediately.

Quicksprout’s Patel: On an actionable tip for improving Search Engine Marketing (SEM)

Neil Patel is the co-founder of Crazy Egg, Hello Bar, and KISSmetrics. (From his “About” page)

He writes about a straightforward tactic to improve search visits, by optimizing keywords you use, versus your competitors.

Great advice for anyone working on optimizing content sites (i.e. all websites).

He talks about gathering the URLs and keywords of your competitor sites:

…Delete the rows that contain the keywords for the homepage URL.

You are doing it because you want to go for long tail phrases as they will drive more total traffic, and they are easier to rank for. Typically, internal pages rank for more long tail phrases than a homepage, which is why you want to delete the rows that contain the homepage URL.

Now that you have a list of keywords your competitors are going after, you should look at their content.

Once you do, create your own content, incorporating similar keywords.The key to this process is to make sure your content is better than your competitor’s. If it isn’t, you won’t generate more social shares, links, or traffic.

FastCo: How Hendrick’s Gin targets hipsters and succeeds in capturing that audience

And the award for most clinical exposition of marketing to hipsters is…

Fast Co’s article on how Hendrick’s Gin, and Pabst Beer, cater to the hipster psychographic.

Read it if you want to learn how to market to hipsters, in a way that reads like an exotic fantasy mystery piece.

“…developed piercing insights into what makes today’s hipster’s tick. Hipsters have increasingly sophisticated sensibilities, finding ways to express their individuality by discovering beautiful, idiosyncratic clothing, music, and art from the past. Hipsters have always been into vintage, but lately, bartenders in trendy neighborhoods have had a decidedly Victorian sensibility, sporting waxed handlebar mustaches, pinstripe vests, and pocket watches.

…’Our target is driven by curiosity,’ says Hendrick’s senior brand manager Kirsten Walpert

‘Hipsters don’t respect money, they respect art,’ says C.C. Chapman, marketing expert and founder of social good consultancy Never Enough Days. “There’s a certain level of craftsmanship that goes into brands that matters to the hipster market. They buy into brands that have put effort into crafting their own story and identity.’

…hipsters around the country were drawn to the beer’s lowbrow roots: It signaled a total rejection of the yuppie households…

Pabst hires field marketers who are exactly like their target consumer, that is to say: hipsters.

‘It involves building brand activators of true hipster, but never ever calling them that,” says Karen Post, a branding expert and author of Brand Turnaround. “They identify the influencers, but don’t sell them out. ‘…

constantly plays into hipster’s fascination with things that are both vintage and idiosyncratic. The brand has invented an elaborate world full of playful, unusual things that they have never seen before…”

A beautiful cookbook like you haven’t seen before: Unless You’re Really Familiar with Obsessively Organized Ingredients

A smart content marketing move from Ikea.

Come out with a cookbook (also a subtle, indirect way of pushing their products – appliances).

But, like their design-for-the-masses philosophy – make it painfully sparse but beautifully useful.

And this is how they presented their rationale and procedure.

Thank you, Internet: An Agency Branded App, 10 Popular Algorithms and a Design Course That’s Helping the Philippines

These three articles mattered to me today.

1.  The 10 Algorithms that Dominate Our World

Would you have ever imagined the day where you would read an article like that?

Where you can list algorithms that pervade everyday life?  I’m so happy for mathematicians, data scientists and programmers all of a sudden.

This is a whole new level of relevance.  All the math geeks from elementary school can laugh in people’s faces.

Google PageRank; Facebook News feeds, “You may also enjoy…” – all math. Cool.

2.  How a Small Nashville Agency Used Creativity to Get Worldwide Recognition

I don’t fully forgive you for that clickbait-y article, Fast Company.

Anyway.

I just never thought an agency could make an app that would sell itself.

Continue reading “Thank you, Internet: An Agency Branded App, 10 Popular Algorithms and a Design Course That’s Helping the Philippines”

Lady bikes inside a store to power a cute conveyor belt, for a Valentine’s gift: Branded video by my favorite notebook brand

Branded video by Muji.

Nice marketing (probably targeted towards current brand-lovers, like me).  So consistent with their brand personality: warm, crafty, with a clean, simple aesthetic.
Aaaand subtly highlights their product range. In a 4 and a half minute video.

Make MUJI.

via popbee.com