fast company

FastCo: How Hendrick’s Gin targets hipsters and succeeds in capturing that audience

And the award for most clinical exposition of marketing to hipsters is…

Fast Co’s article on how Hendrick’s Gin, and Pabst Beer, cater to the hipster psychographic.

Read it if you want to learn how to market to hipsters, in a way that reads like an exotic fantasy mystery piece.

“…developed piercing insights into what makes today’s hipster’s tick. Hipsters have increasingly sophisticated sensibilities, finding ways to express their individuality by discovering beautiful, idiosyncratic clothing, music, and art from the past. Hipsters have always been into vintage, but lately, bartenders in trendy neighborhoods have had a decidedly Victorian sensibility, sporting waxed handlebar mustaches, pinstripe vests, and pocket watches.

…’Our target is driven by curiosity,’ says Hendrick’s senior brand manager Kirsten Walpert

‘Hipsters don’t respect money, they respect art,’ says C.C. Chapman, marketing expert and founder of social good consultancy Never Enough Days. “There’s a certain level of craftsmanship that goes into brands that matters to the hipster market. They buy into brands that have put effort into crafting their own story and identity.’

…hipsters around the country were drawn to the beer’s lowbrow roots: It signaled a total rejection of the yuppie households…

Pabst hires field marketers who are exactly like their target consumer, that is to say: hipsters.

‘It involves building brand activators of true hipster, but never ever calling them that,” says Karen Post, a branding expert and author of Brand Turnaround. “They identify the influencers, but don’t sell them out. ‘…

constantly plays into hipster’s fascination with things that are both vintage and idiosyncratic. The brand has invented an elaborate world full of playful, unusual things that they have never seen before…”

Thank you, Internet: An Agency Branded App, 10 Popular Algorithms and a Design Course That’s Helping the Philippines

These three articles mattered to me today.

1.  The 10 Algorithms that Dominate Our World

Would you have ever imagined the day where you would read an article like that?

Where you can list algorithms that pervade everyday life?  I’m so happy for mathematicians, data scientists and programmers all of a sudden.

This is a whole new level of relevance.  All the math geeks from elementary school can laugh in people’s faces.

Google PageRank; Facebook News feeds, “You may also enjoy…” – all math. Cool.

2.  How a Small Nashville Agency Used Creativity to Get Worldwide Recognition

I don’t fully forgive you for that clickbait-y article, Fast Company.

Anyway.

I just never thought an agency could make an app that would sell itself.

Continue reading

Wes Anderson | The 100 Most Creative People in Business in 2012 | Fast Company

Fast Company 100 Most Creative People 2012: I’m impressed.

I know I am such a fan girl, even of the hard-copy-physical-media magazine.

But, I think this is how a text-rich magazine is translated smartly to web.

It retains the strengths of a text content-rich magazine, plus the way they structured the information, and how to navigate through it, is just practical.

It prepares for and takes advantage of the strengths of web.

On paper or print, a large part of the ease is just being able to randomly flip-through.

I just realized now that I can go through and enjoy an entire magazine without even reading the table of contents.

Not the same for a web experience – people won’t click on things that they don’t feel will have something interesting “behind” it.

Now, that makes it hard because that means every single piece of content you have has to have an enticing way of being found.

Be it through a text link, an engaging image or a meaningful description.

But, what the web has, that print doesn’t, is adaptability (according to your personal taste).  It can allow you to explore a single set of information using multiple systems of navigation – going through something the way you’d find interesting.

And, that’s what Fast Company did for their 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012 issue.

The design team for the feature, who I’d like to name and laud if I could (I’ll try to find them), decided to have two ways of wading through the content.

You can either go through:

1) a countdown-type, names-in-order of “creativity” list (similar to the magazine),

2) or through a skill-centered path, where you go through the articles according to what advice or skill sets you want to work on.

The skill-groups are cute, too:

Be Weirder

Do Good, Well

Be More Productive

Think

Rethink

Sell

Lead

See, relevant and concise.

The entries themselves also follow the little guidelines I see on the usability sites, and they help.

Bulleted lists, highlighted text, one-paragraph nuggets of content; relevant hyperlinks.

If they had used the exact same format from the magazine, it would have been so much harder and less interesting to go through.

I think I actually like the information architecture more than the list itself haha.  I shall just leave a comment on their page. Yay, Fast Company!

[Sorry for the really long image, I screengrabbed the entire page.]

Screen shot 2012-02-01 at 9.29.08 PM

Fast Company Redesign: Making me, uncharacteristically, favor digital over print

Lo and behold, Fast Co. got a nice new facelift and punched up their digital brand extensions!

*Forgive me, I first started writing this post on February 01, 2012, but I didn’t get around to posting until now.  So this is severely outdated.

I haven’t even checked out the Fast Company site in quite a while; but the article link from my Facebook feed seemed interesting.

To my surprise, this page opened in my browser:

I can’t even fully remember what it looked like before, which slightly frustrates me since it would have been great to compare them side by side.  But, even without an actual copy of the old design, this current one just seemed much cleaner, and immersive.

The page also contained a link to the strategy behind the redesign.

My liking for the comments section was sparked by that redesign article.  I liked how they were thoughtful about users’ feeling that they were part of the content – using sophisticated type and a sizable font to showcase the comments.  Smart smart smart.  Made me want to see my name in each comment stream.

Kudos to the team, I love how it does feel more like a magazine adapted to the digital age.  There’s a splashy cover photo, clean, smart fonts, and I like the subdued pinstripe  underneath the sidebar.

I aso like the execution of the “social layer” – with the links being “called up” only when you hover over the smartly designed Share, Like and Tweet counters, and the fixed header once you scroll past the first fold!

Surf Trail: Playgrounds

When I grow up, I want to be a playground designer.

Unfortunately, I do not have (yet) an architecture background, or even basic design training.  I do want to buy a book about it, though.

As if that makes me qualified.

 

Old Singapore Playgrounds: Justin Zhuang

Fast Co. Design – Infographic of the Day

 

Overdesign

Social Platforms over Logos

IDEO Crave Aid