7 Magazine-type blogs: Culture-curation’s really where it’s at now, I guess?

1.  Flavorwire  – “Cultural news and critique

I like the relationship between this cultural news magazine, and Flavorpill, which is their web app to “find events in your city”.

A well thought-out experience, of learning about, finding and going to interesting things.

In fact, I would probably measure the success of a “culture news” website by the number of individual articles I feel like spontaneously opening, plus the number of outgoing links that I also open.

In that case –

Articles:  4

10 Criminally Underrated 90’s songs

Video of the day: If Pinterest were Invented in the 90’s

What’s On at Flavorpill: The Links that Made the Rounds in Our Office

Glowing Night Photos of Urban Grocers

Clicked external links: 4

Jawbreaker Shot Glass

and, from probably one of the most addictingly viral “pop culture news” magazine sites – Buzzfeed:

The Top 10 Most Legally and Illegally Downloaded TV Shows

14 Trends from Coachella 2012 You’ll Probably See More of This Summer

13 Untapped 90’s Fashion Trends

2.  Domus I love this magazine/site.  It looks just immersing and beautiful, and the features are good slices of the art and design world.

3.  Kempt

I like this.  In comparison to hearty (#6 in this list), this is more like what I’m talking about.

Distinct voice, even if isn’t exactly for me.

Feels crowded, but the content seems well-written enough – fresh takes on even “normal”-seeming things.

4. The SuperSlice

Slick and snazzy.

Altogether glossy branding and design.  With the slim category colors and clean serif title fonts.

5.  Social Design Zine

In Italian and English, I think one of the more high-brow and intellectual among this bunch, with reviews of design books and analyses of logos.

6.  hearty magazine

Love their logo, and the look of their header.

Unfortunately, I don’t fully know what to make of the magazine’s “voice”.

Not as youthfully luxurious and fashionably brash as Nylon, but also not as insightful a cultural lens as Thought Catalog.

For me it’s like the “Cosmopolitan” magazine of the web: it’s a bit too full of fluff, I’d rather read a men’s magazine.

7.  The DEFGRIP blog.

Bike culture and art.

I love that it has such a clean and crisp aesthetic for a BMX culture magazine.

Diversity is so beautiful.

Advertisements

5 Favorite Finds: Wendy MacNaughton, Zeldman blog, The Atlantic Cities, Emily Badger, Citizens for Optimism

I am floored by people’s amazing brains.

1.  Via The Littlest Comma, I found my way to Wendy MacNaughton’s blog and illustrations.  I am definitely going to buy one of her pieces from 20×200.

She’s clever, and her illustrations are accurate, but quirkily fun.

2.  The Zeldman site, by Jeffrey Zeldman, A List Apart‘s main man and founder of Happy Cog.

He recently featured notes from An Event Apart, as taken by Luke Wroblewski: on Kim Goodwin’s Silo-Busting with Scenarios, Zeldman’s Content First, and Whitney Hess’s What’s Your Problem?

3.  The Atlantic Cities

"Subway Platforms Around The World"

I like how they have a special (and engaging) section on Neighborhoods and urban planning.  It’s such a content- and category-rich site :O

Yes, that was an emoticon.  I can’t express how amazed I am at the sections they thought of.

Like “The Democracy in America” section!  Where they have a This Week in Bans feature!

Why I find this cool – this week’s feature, for example, on parents in New York’s Park Slope trying to express how they want ice cream vendors to be banned from the park is a genius example of freedom of speech. Particularly, this one line from a comment stream, that just shows the interplay of different economic forces at work: “I should not have to fight with my children every warm day on the playground just so someone can make a living!”

Other articles I bookmarked were: The Map Geeks Behind “Bostonography” and America’s Urban-Rural Work Divide (which I want to use as inspiration when categorizing occupations).

4.  Emily Badger, whose articles I found in The Atlantic Cities.

I like the way she writes, and what she writes about.  She writes about cultural trends regarding architecture and urban spaces, but in a relatable and un-hoighty-toighty way, like in I Can’t Stop Looking at Photos of Absurdly Tiny Homes.

5.  Citizens For Optimism, a group of designers who created posters based on words that a survey of New Yorkers associated with “optimism”.

Joe Hollier - "Sing"
Pablo Delkan - "Dream"

Honeysuckle is my word for the day

Thank you, Fabiano Meneghetti.  Out of your one post on Abduzeedo yesterday, I found so many things to love.

I’m basically reblogging his post, just with my own comments.  When least unnecessary. (That phrase is confusing, but accurate)

By Jeremy Geddes
By Cristian Valverde
by Rudiger Trost

I especially loved Rudiger Trost’s 365-day blog.  I don’t know if it’s just the splash page of close-up, colorful or clever pictures, or the translucent fuchsia logo in the upper left-hand corner, but, in a word, to me, it’s…refreshing. Like visual orange juice every day.

Bigeye

This was from a feature on website sliders, but what I really liked was the chubby, feminine font.

Puma House by Nendo

Ah, Puma.  Smart design choices.  I would love to get lost in this place. Hopefully, with a thousand dollars.

Color of the Year

It is a cheery color.

Behavior Model from Stanford Persuasive Tech Lab

I. Am. Very. Fortunate. To have come across the whole universe of Interaction Design.  Yes, it is going to be a widely popular (and, potentially, overused and abused) field in the next decade.  But, Lord, please, please help me ride the crest of the first wave, if ever.  I will work hard.  Finally, something that marries my interest in technical psychology or neuroscience tidbits and design for better usage.  Great professional site/blog from Stephen Anderson.  Wise, wise man.  I will have to start a consumer culture Rockstars series.

FitText by Paravel

I don’t know anything about web design yet, but this just seems convenient off the bat.

Hyper Island Featurette

Relevant.