LFTD: “Think of storytelling before responsive design”

Useful, well-written post by Jani Modig on Medium.

There are many articles these days on the importance of content, but Modig’s proof seem to be the clearest, and simplest to remember:

“according to the latest statistics (verified by The Associated Press)and even the goldfish have an ability to concentrate longer than us”
 
“I had spent couple of all nighters watching Game of Thrones on my laptop and in the following mornings I realized I was explaining to clients that people are just browsing web, not really concentrating on the content.”
 

Jani Modig is a UX designer.  See more of his work here.

Jani Modig Portfolio (Skype)
Jani Modig Portfolio (Skype)
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Grab bag: Rural America technology, Facebook-brand tracking, bacon salt and party kit packaging design

Open-tab cleaning.

1. The High-Tech of Rural America

Why do I like this?  Because it’s an example of how design and technology serve people’s needs (and yes, businessmen’s pockets).
Too often, my job revolves arounds trying to plan applications that seem so unrelated to what people need or are going through.
Hooray for rural America!

The DeLaval AMR Circular Cow Milker
The DeLaval AMR Circular Cow Milker

2.  The Wired Social Index

Let’s see how this works out.  Tracking the financial performance of the strongest brands on Facebook.
The Wired Social Index

3. The Donut Project

I’m partly biased towards the name.

But, nice source of interesting images and videos.

Boys & Girls' reception area
Boys & Girls’ reception area
Jason Bacher wallpaper

4.  Bacon Salt and a Sundae Kit.  Ideas from Buzzfeed’s 38 Ways to Give the Gift of Food.

Bacon Salt
Bacon Salt
Sundae Kit
Sundae Kit

This entry led me to…

5.  Manic Design’s Merrymaking Must-Haves Kit on Lovely Package

Smart, smart, smart.  And cleanly designed.

Merrymaking Must-haves Kit - Manic Design
Merrymaking Must-haves Kit – Manic Design

5 Ideas I liked (since January): Pie + Creative brainstorming, Google work philosophy, Watercolor Typography, Facebook Userflow

1. One of my favorite ideas in the past year.

Pie + User Feedback or Community Involvement + Design = PieLab

2.  This PaidContent article on the insensitive coincidences of online ads and tragic news stories (e.g. shooting massacre articles and bloody novelty shirt ads).

Screencap by Evan Brown

3.  “Why Google Does Things The Way It Does“, by The Guardian.

Thought-provoking.  Because you keep hearing about how Google is revolutionary, but they’re never as suave at branding themselves as Apple, plus they have weird ideas like Google glass, and annoying decisions like killing Google Reader:

“In its behaviour and vocabulary, Google oozes scientific method. A couple of times recently I’ve heard Google executives say in public, ‘if you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it’. …engineers are trained not to act on intuition. You are allowed to have intuition, of course, but you use it to make hypotheses, which you then test. You act on the results of those tests…

When an experiment is completed, you either choose to follow up on it, or you terminate it and move on to something else. A scientist doesn’t get emotional about this; it’s the way the system works, and everyone knows that it’s all for the best.”

4.  I don’t know which I enjoyed more – the Maricor/Maricar watercolor typography exercises…

Or the Shillington Design Blog “I Love These Guys” category page, where they were featured?

Shillington Design Blog - MaricorMaricar
Shillington Design Blog – MaricorMaricar

5.  Facebook sharing its “Report Abuse” interaction flow.

6 Fun finds: Cake furniture, Bags for mess-less toast, logical fallacies, a cute wedding invitation, an IDEO experimental twitter project and an Audrey Tatou movie

Haven’t had these visual collection posts in a while.  No wonder tabs are piling up again, haha.

1. Cake Furniture!

Sapore dei Mobili, by Ryosuke Fukusada and Rui Pereira via hovercraftdoggy

2.  Toaster Bags! by Boska via Co. Design

Smart! You get the grilled cheese, you get the grill marks, but you don’t get the hot dripping ooze and hard-to-clean crumbs everywhere.

Usable up to 50 times!

The amazing things…polytetrafluoroethylene can do.

3.  John & Sally Argyle Wedding Invitations via Designspiration

I love these.  Beautifully designed, clever and clean.

Just because it’s an age-old tradition-slash-sacrament doesn’t mean you can’t make the invite fresh.

4.  Delicacy via I-D

Just seemed like a movie I’d like to look for.  Read the review here.

5.  Exquisite Corpse, by IDEO Labs via Core77

6.  YourLogicalFallacyIs

Interesting site outlining various propaganda tools and techniques.

Fast Company 100 Most Creative People 2012: I’m impressed.

I know I am such a fan girl, even of the hard-copy-physical-media magazine.

But, I think this is how a text-rich magazine is translated smartly to web.

It retains the strengths of a text content-rich magazine, plus the way they structured the information, and how to navigate through it, is just practical.

It prepares for and takes advantage of the strengths of web.

On paper or print, a large part of the ease is just being able to randomly flip-through.

I just realized now that I can go through and enjoy an entire magazine without even reading the table of contents.

Not the same for a web experience – people won’t click on things that they don’t feel will have something interesting “behind” it.

Now, that makes it hard because that means every single piece of content you have has to have an enticing way of being found.

Be it through a text link, an engaging image or a meaningful description.

But, what the web has, that print doesn’t, is adaptability (according to your personal taste).  It can allow you to explore a single set of information using multiple systems of navigation – going through something the way you’d find interesting.

And, that’s what Fast Company did for their 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012 issue.

The design team for the feature, who I’d like to name and laud if I could (I’ll try to find them), decided to have two ways of wading through the content.

You can either go through:

1) a countdown-type, names-in-order of “creativity” list (similar to the magazine),

2) or through a skill-centered path, where you go through the articles according to what advice or skill sets you want to work on.

The skill-groups are cute, too:

Be Weirder

Do Good, Well

Be More Productive

Think

Rethink

Sell

Lead

See, relevant and concise.

The entries themselves also follow the little guidelines I see on the usability sites, and they help.

Bulleted lists, highlighted text, one-paragraph nuggets of content; relevant hyperlinks.

If they had used the exact same format from the magazine, it would have been so much harder and less interesting to go through.

I think I actually like the information architecture more than the list itself haha.  I shall just leave a comment on their page. Yay, Fast Company!

[Sorry for the really long image, I screengrabbed the entire page.]

Design links: Prettily creative kids’ crafts’ site; Hiroki Nakamura, my style icon, fun typography features and manufactured-ly “vintage” design

1. MiniEco.co.uk

Aaargh, visually arresting site for crafting with kids!

I love the rainbow sprinkles-popcorn feature and all the rainbow objects!

2.  Hiroki Nakamura and VISVIM

This man is one of my style icons.  Not all his products really, but more of how he carries himself.  And how he’s able to pull off green bead necklaces with crisp shirts, and still seem like a gruff, straight but sophisticated man.

I also like his backpacks, and his retail philosopy.

VISVIM Laminaria Kudu

3. Onion Typography featured in CMYBacon

Onion Typography by André Baumecker

4.  Mid-Century Modern Typefaces Identified, featured in CMYBacon

Lubalin Graphic Bold – MCMTypefaces.Tumblr

5.  I like the old school, rough and artisanal design feel, so I enjoy this list of

40 Vintage and Retro Web Design Inspirations from InspirationFeed

Teenage Engineering: The group that helped Ikea make a digicam out of cardboard

Ohmilawrd.  This site deserves its own entry.

Teenage Engineering was mentioned in the articles for IKEA KNÄPPA, the cheapest digital camera created, crafted from cardboard, featured on petapixel.

Teenage Engineering worked with Ikea on the camera, and with a name like that, I had to check out their site (wrong pronoun placement/use of antecedents).

I have to post their “About Us”-slash-“Careers” page.  I would like to work for a place that thinks of pages like this (but that’s just the fangirl in me talking):

The Stockholm agency’s current main product is a digital synthesizer and this is their product feature page:

That’s really all.  I just really wanted to show their site off. Haha nice clean, but colorfully loud aesthetic, highlighting their products.

P.S. While, I’m at it – this PS AT HOME site by Ikea, also a great idea.

Featuring their products in actual people’s homes.  Good strategy.