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Does anyone else wish their life were like a Vimeo video?: 5 of my favorites

Or is it just me?

Sundrenched.  With lens flares here and there and saturated or overexposed color, with blur in the right places.  Clear skin and glowing eyes, “hip” musical accompaniment all around.

And I know this is heavily affected by my search queries, but all the free time, sense of adventure, dedication to making videos of yourself having fun in an attractive way.  Surf, sand, sea, not a care in the world and free-as-a-bird youth lifestyle.

Presenting, my favorite vimeo video: Taj Burrow’s Fiji Vignette Part 3

The best lookbook I’ve seen so far.  Pretty, pretty girl.  Cute storytelling.  And the coolest girlish swimsuit designs I’ve seen.  Granted, the model’s body is amazing, but besides that, the designs themselves are simple, but smart.

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dove3

Nike: Chosen

Ah, Nike.  I see you are starting to be more aggressive about pandering to the microtrend of individual sport.

In 2007, Mark Penn published the book Microtrends.

Apparently, he’s the man who coined the term “soccer moms”.

In the book, Penn discusses other emerging trends that were sparked by at least 1% of the American population, which, he proposes, could become significant in the next years.

In the field of sports, Penn noted the growing interest in niche and individualized sports, and the decreased involvement in the mainstream and more established team sports (e.g. football, basketball).

In this stunning video by Instrument, Nike shows its ready to beat, okay maybe match Vans, Converse, DC and Roxy at their games.

Nike “Chosen” by Instrument

Even if the niche sport “microtrend” may seem a bit dated (“discovered” 4 years ago), the Nike “Chosen” campaign still makes me proud of how Nike seems to have a good nose for youth culture.

Even the copy for the campaign tries to talk to a new audience — no longer the same market that their physical potency- and determination-centered communication used to target.

Instead, the campaign’s copy recognizes the present youth’s inclination towards uniqueness, flair and self-promotion.

“Take the stage and own the spot light. We’re looking for crews pushing the boundaries of style and creativity. Because the further you go, the further we all go.”

via fubiz

I have to correct myself now, though.  It apparently isn’t the first time that a Nike campaign featured skateboarding.  In my search for more old school testosterone-y Nike ads from the 1990’s (to feature in this post), I came across a blog entry which was a collection of Nike ad graphic design that the blogger was impressed with.

This particular ad was released in 2007 – the “This Is How I Fight” campaign.

I love you slightly more today because of this, Nike.  I have to find the agency or communications group that came up with this campaign.  I’m sorry, “Chosen”, but “This Is How I Fight” edged you out in my heart.

And, while I’m at it, I might as well post the very first Nike ads (from 1989) that sparked my liking for the Nike brand, and for copywriting and branding.

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Mashable: Facebook and Apple Reward Employees for Freezing Their Ovary Eggs

Mashable talks about how Apple followed Facebook’s lead in covering up to $20,000 worth of health benefits, should a female employee choose to go through the egg-freezing procedure.

This news is inherently…intriguing.

It:

a) sounds funny when you hear it,

b) is ultimately useful and practical,

c) is played up by the media as positive, but

d) makes you think about the cultural and biological realities of how women need to undergo procedures just to “have it all”.

i.e. the personal goals and ambition that this generation of women have go against the body’s natural fertility.

It’s a “good thing”, that’s a solution to a tough choice.  Money & personal passion VS Growing your own family.

A question this also brings up is: even if you could freeze your eggs, would you and your husband want to have a 20 year-old eldest child at 55?  Implying that if you had a second child at 38, you would then have a generation of 58 year-olds putting kids through college.

Apple and Facebook are adding a new perk for female employees: Free egg freezing that would let them delay parenting for a few years.

Facebook started offering the service on Jan. 1. Apple plans to begin in January 2015, according to NBC News

Like IVF, egg freezing is typically not covered by an employer’s health insurance. Egg freezing currently costs about $10,000 plus up to $1,000 a year for maintenance. (Facebook and Apple are both covering costs of egg freezing up to $20,000.) McCarthy says the success rates from a frozen egg match those of a fresh egg.

In other words, if you freeze your eggs at age 27 and then wait until age 35 to try in vitro fertilization, the egg will behave like a 27-year-old’s.

Fast Company: Monocle launches a business management guide

I love this article — on a gut level, because it goes against the popularity of “startups” — but, more seriously, because of its business advice based on Monocle’s own business journey and the business success of its featured shops.

“”Startup” is an empty word….

Entrepreneurial success seen through the Monocle lens looks different: It’s slower-growing, more painstaking, less giddily affluent. The businesses profiled sell tangible products–ceramics, goat cheese–and are run by grown-ups versus the delayed adolescents one associates with Silicon Valley…

“petiteness” (not getting too big, too fast) and “social terroir” (rooting your business in place and community, and staying responsive to the needs of that community)…

Pitch your product upmarket, where higher margins prevail; don’t sell products, curate an experience; cater to consumer tastes you understand well; cross-pollinate ideas across industries; and tilt your business model as necessary (a gelato “university” in a high-rent locale is more financially sustainable than a simple gelato shop)…

…So yes, if you have a great new idea you may be able to steal a march on everyone else, but most new businesses are actually repeating–but refining–old ideas. There is always room for a new café done better or a magazine that does its own thing.

A good brand is built through repetition and you have to have the confidence to keep repeating what you do best until you get the breakthrough. The other important thing is to choose steady progress over what may seem like easy wins. They are usually hollow.

…Canvass opinions, do your research, check the market, but in the end you’ll only make it if you know what your passion is for, and you stick with it.  Sometimes people won’t understand what you are trying to achieve at first.

… each person has learned to be open to the input of their team…but, in the end, they are the keeper of the flame. They are brave enough to make the big decisions.

When you feel that you’re just responding to the next urgent request all the time and need some bigger thoughts, get out of your office, turn off that phone, be distracted by something bigger than the task at hand…”

NY Times: U.S. School Lunch as Political Battleground

The New York Times article speaks about the power of attentiveness and “human” treatment.

“but Matz, wry and impish even in his late 60s, lavished the lunch ladies with the kind of respect they didn’t always get in school cafeterias…

“He would tell everybody: ‘You are a much better lobbyist than I am. You are how we get things done,’ ” said Dorothy Caldwell, who served a term as the association’s president in the early 1990s. “And people liked that.”

Matz often told the lunch ladies they were front-line warriors in the battle for better eating, and they liked that too…Few workers, inside the government or out, did more to shape the health of children.

Last summer, the School Nutrition Association dumped Matz…Even as they claim to support the act, the lunch ladies have become the shock troops in a sometimes absurdly complex battle to roll back the Obama’s administration’s anti-obesity agenda.”

And the food wars behind federal school lunches:

“…plates had to have fewer “starchy vegetables,” obvious code words for French fries.

The starchy-vegetable lobby was quick to take offense. “We didn’t find favor with efforts to paint certain vegetables as, for unspecified reasons, less healthy than other vegetables,” was how Kraig R. Naasz, the head of the American Frozen Food Institute, which represents about 500 makers of frozen foods and vegetables, explained it…

Matz was not only lobbying for the lunch ladies, who wanted to abolish the mandatory fruit-and-vegetable requirement, but he also was general counsel to the fresh-produce trade association, which loved the requirement.

Kraig Naasz, the frozen-food advocate, was also impressed. “I’m supposed to explain in seven to 10 seconds how many ounces of tomato paste should get credited when it comes as a paste,” Naasz told me. “And Margo gets to say, ‘Congress thinks pizza is a vegetable.’ ”

Businessweek: Sarah Silverman Launches a Salary (Gender) Equality Campaign

Curious, but exciting choice for the voice of closing the gender gap regarding salary.

Who do you think set up the partnership — Sarah Silverman or Droga5?

Businessweek reports that the campaign is a partnership between the comedienne and the agency:

“Are you a woman? Congratulations: Sarah Silverman wants to give you $435,000. That’s roughly the amount of money you’re expected to lose, on average, over the course of your working career solely because you’re, as Silverman so gently puts it, “a vagina owner.” Silverman and New York advertising firm Droga5 have teamed up to close the estimated 78¢ gender pay gap (as determined by a 2013 U.S. Census Bureau study) by just writing checks to the 69 million working women to cover their loss. And she needs only $29,811,746,430,000 to do it.”

Blue Ivy to Beyonce, Backstage: “Everybody Say Good Job”

I love this video.

1) Entertainment isn’t a human “need”. But when entertainment’s done well, that doesn’t matter.

It can be a stronger motivator to influence behavior or purchase than practical needs.

2) This is what it takes to make good entertainment.

3) It was Beyonce’s birthday yesterday, and her daughter said “Everybody say good job”.

Yay for Empowering Holidays in June! Official days for “Making” and “Women in Engineering”

They might be fueled by propaganda or PR, but I love the thought of these two new holidays.

Barack Obama just declared June 18 as the United States’ National Day of Making.

Presidential Proclamation    National Day of Making  2014   The White House

 

 

The Guardian featured the twitter accounts of six engineers with brains and a sense of humor for the United Kingdom’s National Women in Engineering Day.

National Women in Engineering Day  six Twitter accounts to follow   Women in Leadership   Guardian Professional

Vintage all around: Magazines, Movie Posters and Playboy’s “Language of Legs”

I like websites that just list really good content for that day, every day.

Like this Sidebar.io link that I’ve been keeping open.

And Cool Material’s Sunday Hangover.

Which leads me to goodies such as:

19 First Covers of American Magazines

People Magazine – March 4, 1974

 

Playboy’s The Language of Legs, from The Selvedge Yard.

 

All of Saul Bass’s Movie Posters, from Film.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seriously.  It isn’t purely out of nostalgia.  Graphic design looked pretty good back then.